Climate Zones

When we moved to New Hampshire after retiring, I did not realize how much I would miss my flower garden on Long Island (zone 7a, winter low  +5 to 0 deg F). Creating a perennial bed in NH (zone 5a, winter low  -15 to -20 deg F) was a challenge! After three summers I was happy to have gathered about 20 perennials hardy enough to survive a NH winter.

But day-lilies, lupin, phlox, daisy, coneflower, coreopsis, salvia, rudbeckia, astilbe,  knockout rose and hibiscus braved the strong north-west winds off the lake and the -20deg lows, and put on a brave show of NH color by our third summer!

Now we are back on Long Island, remembering the delights of our half-acre 10 years ago, and hoping to recreate at least a miniature perennial bed in our new small yard! Bleeding Heart, honeysuckle, peony, astilbe, phlox, tea rose, hydrangea, hibiscus loved the long mild growing season.

Take a look and see the difference two climate zones makes! Can you tell which zone is which? (OK, you gardeners know at first glance!). Each is beautiful in its own way. Given time, you can not only survive, but flourish, wherever you are planted…

 

 

Fields and Farms

The East End of the Island, especially the North Fork, is fertile farm land. Once covered with potato farms – a few barns remain – it is now home to small farms and farm stands, pumpkin and strawberry fields, tree and plant nurseries, sod farms and – most important now to the area’s economy – vineyards and wineries. “Wine tours” are big business as buses, limousines, and bikes for hire bring over a million people each year to the 50+ wineries that have been created over the past 40 years (and saved the East End from being built over).

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Potato barns still dot the landscape

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Tree nurseries provide for the large suburban population to the west

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Huge sod farms barely survive the pressures of home building and installation of solar arrays. One still provides turf for Yankee Stadium!

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Vines now cover thousands of acres and supply over 50 wineries

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Pine Barrens

 

The Pine Barrens are the Island’s last wilderness – now mainly in a 100,000 acre protected area of woodlands, ponds and streams in Riverhead and Brookhaven townships, the headwaters of the Peconic River and Bay. Pitch pine and oak thrive in the meager sandy soil, a remnant of the coastal forest that once stretched from Cape Cod, MA to Cape May, NJ.