Climate Zones

When we moved to New Hampshire after retiring, I did not realize how much I would miss my flower garden on Long Island (zone 7a, winter low  +5 to 0 deg F). Creating a perennial bed in NH (zone 5a, winter low  -15 to -20 deg F) was a challenge! After three summers I was happy to have gathered about 20 perennials hardy enough to survive a NH winter.

But day-lilies, lupin, phlox, daisy, coneflower, coreopsis, salvia, rudbeckia, astilbe,  knockout rose and hibiscus braved the strong north-west winds off the lake and the -20deg lows, and put on a brave show of NH color by our third summer!

Now we are back on Long Island, remembering the delights of our half-acre 10 years ago, and hoping to recreate at least a miniature perennial bed in our new small yard! Bleeding Heart, honeysuckle, peony, astilbe, phlox, tea rose, hydrangea, hibiscus loved the long mild growing season.

Take a look and see the difference two climate zones makes! Can you tell which zone is which? (OK, you gardeners know at first glance!). Each is beautiful in its own way. Given time, you can not only survive, but flourish, wherever you are planted…

 

 

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2 comments on “Climate Zones

  1. I think besides showing us a lovely cascade of beautiful perennials, you just might be reminding us of something important – “you can not only survive, but flourish, wherever you are planted…”. Thank you. But, please don’t remind me too many times that now you are gardening in zone 7. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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